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Boise State's Scared, Jay Rome And Malcolm Mitchell, And Georgia Tech Baseball: Around The Perimeter

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Thrashers: Missed this earlier in the week, but it's still relevant. TSN, Canada's ESPN, did a piece for Martin Luther King Jr. Day on the four black Atlanta Thrashers players and what it means to be a black athlete in a mostly white sport in Dr. King's city. It's a little forced in parts -- these guys grew up in Minnesota and Canada in the 1990s, and while they're aware and respectful of the Civil Rights Movement, it doesn't seem to be something they go out of their way to think about every day.

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Dawgs: While Georgia Bulldogs fans were gathering to watch the announcements of top recruits Jay Rome and Malcolm Mitchell, the Boise St. Broncos were having the Mountain West Conference screw the TCU Horned Frogs out of a home game. If they can't even play a conference team without their magical blue turf, how shook must they be about playing Georgia in the Dome? <---- Homeriest thing I've written all month.

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Jackets: Football season didn't go as hoped, football recruiting has been one big tease, and the basketball team still has a long way to go. But hey -- it's almost baseball season.

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Braves: This Flip Flop Fly Ball map pinpoints a town named Turner in Montana as the most baseball-remote city in the mainland United States. Its name is a funny coincidence, as Ted Turner owns land in Montana and a restaurant chain named after the state, and perhaps his greatest achievement was turning the Braves into a team that huge portions of the country could see, no matter how far from Atlanta. Do you think Turner, Montana ever became Braves Country?

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(No, Turner, Montana isn't named after Ted.)

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This has been your daily-ish circling of the Atlanta sports blogosphere and more. If you have anything that belongs here next time, holler. To ride with us again tomorrow or so, follow @SBNAtlanta on Twitter.

Photographs by coka_koehler used in background montage under Creative Commons. Thank you.