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Justice Department Considering BCS Investigation After Meeting With Utah Attorney General

The U.S. Justice Department met with Mark Shurtleff, Utah's attorney general, to talk college football earlier this week. Specifically, the BCS. More specifically, whether the BCS is legal. The great state of Utah has been crusading against the BCS for a while now, ever since the 2008 Utah Utes weren't invited to the BCS title game despite posting an undefeated record. The Utes took it out on the Alabama Crimson Tide in the Sugar Bowl.

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Is this anything? I don't know. Earlier this year Utah senator Orrin Hatch sort of got the Obama administration involved in some way or another, which may or may not mean anything, since the president of the United States is sort of involved in all matters relating to or not relating to everything. Barack Obama himself supports a playoff system FWIW.

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A playoff system would've been pretty darn nice to have around back in 2002 and 2005. Both seasons featured the Georgia Bulldogs in the nation's top five after winning the SEC. And the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets might've been able to take advantage of a playoff last year, when they were ranked ninth heading into their BCS game. Paul Johnson's offense works best on short notice, and he regularly owned the FCS' weekly playoff tournament back at Georgia Southern.

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To the SEC fan, a playoff would mean multiple SEC teams would have a shot at the title instead of just the automatic one. ACC fans ... well, just be glad the Virginia Tech Hokies would get to make an appearance every year.

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So is this anything? Probably not. The BCS can't last forever -- can it? -- but we'll see. All right.

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Photographs by coka_koehler used in background montage under Creative Commons. Thank you.